The Listening Room
Classical | Choral
 

 

MIT Chamber Chorus

Prologue from the opera Griffelkin
by Lukas Foss

Performed by MIT Chamber Chorus
December 7, 2015, 5pm, Kresge Auditorium

William Cutter

MIT Chamber Chorus

O Fortuna
Carmina Burana
Carl Orff

William Cutter, Music Director
2011

MIT Concert Choir

Alleluia
Randall Thompson

William Cutter, Music Director

MIT Chamber Chorus

Under the Willow Tree
Vanessa, Act II

Samuel Barber
William Cutter, Music Director

Under the Willow Tree is a beautiful duet from Barber's opera, "Vanessa." It first premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City in 1958. The story revolves around a love triangle between Vanessa, her niece Erika, and Anatol, the son of Vanessa's former lover.

William Cutter

MIT Chamber Chorus

Spring Rituals
Lo the earth awakes again

William Cutter
William Cutter, Music Director

MIT Concert Choir

MIT Concert Choir

Song of Liberty, A Blake Cantata
I. The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: The Argument

Peter Child, Professor of Music
William Cutter, Music Director

The opening movement of Song of Liberty: A Blake Cantata is the beginning of William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. This is Blake in his most thunderous, prophetic voice: “Rintrah roars & shakes his fires in the burden’d air; / Hungry clouds swag on the deep." The prominent percussion in the music accentuates the dramatic, insistent tone of the poetry, and the imagery is captured through transparent musical allusion depicting the buzzing of bees, the flowing waters of the river and the spring, the creeping serpent. After this apocalyptic first movement, the remainder of the cantata treats Blake's celebration of love and mysticism.

MIT Concert Choir

MIT Concert Choir

Agnus Dei
Dona Nobis Pacem

Ralph Vaughan Williams
William Cutter, Music Director

Ralph Vaughan Williams wrote this 1936 cantata for chorus and orchestra with soprano and baritone soloists. The work is divided into six parts using religious texts, poetry, and a political speech. The first is Agnus Dei, which is taken from the last movement of the Roman Catholic Mass.